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View Full Version : What happens if my throwout bearing completely goes out?



r0ckstarr
11-30-2010, 09:10 PM
In the morning when I start up my Ranger (or after it's been sitting for a few hours), I can hear a faint whine noise. (Been doing this for about a month now). It sounds like a bearing starting to go out. If I apply just a slight bit of pressue to my clutch pedal (push the pedal down even an inch), the noise stops. Same goes for if I hold the pedal to the floor.

But as soon as I move my foot from the pedal, the noise comes back. It only does this until I drive the truck, and I guess put a load on the bearing itself. After that, it doesn't make the noise anymore.

This leads me to think that it is my throwout bearing. What do you think?

What could happen if the bearing goes completely out, locks up, breaks, or whatever before I have the chance to change it? Will I not be able to get it into gear, change gears, or be stuck in a gear?

I ask because with my current schedule, it may be a week or two before I can get to it.

John Codman
11-30-2010, 09:24 PM
The classic "bad throwout bearing" makes noise when the clutch pedal is depressed. This of course puts a load on the bearing. When the clutch pedal is not depressed - the throwout (release) bearing should be sitting on the transmission input shaft sleeve doing nothing. Is there normal play in the clutch pedal? If there is very little or no play when the pedal is not depressed, it could be that the bearing is contacting the pressure plate fingers or diaphragm and making a bit of noise. Solution: Increase the free play of the clutch pedal. Typically, release bearings will whine and then howl for quite a while before they fail catastrophically. In the unlikely event the bearing does self-destruct, you would have to start the car in first gear, then find out how good you are at clutchless shifting. It can be done, but if you fail at it you will need to add the cost of a transmission to the parts bill.

bhambulldog
11-30-2010, 09:59 PM
In the morning when I start up my Ranger (or after it's been sitting for a few hours), I can hear a faint whine noise. (Been doing this for about a month now). It sounds like a bearing starting to go out. If I apply just a slight bit of pressue to my clutch pedal (push the pedal down even an inch), the noise stops. Same goes for if I hold the pedal to the floor.

But as soon as I move my foot from the pedal, the noise comes back. It only does this until I drive the truck, and I guess put a load on the bearing itself. After that, it doesn't make the noise anymore.

This leads me to think that it is my throwout bearing. What do you think?

What could happen if the bearing goes completely out, locks up, breaks, or whatever before I have the chance to change it? Will I not be able to get it into gear, change gears, or be stuck in a gear?

I ask because with my current schedule, it may be a week or two before I can get to it.

[quote=John Codman;1755973In the unlikely event the bearing does self-destruct, you would have to start the car in first gear, then find out how good you are at clutchless shifting. It can be done, but if you fail at it you will need to add the cost of a transmission to the parts bill.[/quote]
:Smarty:Any time you have transmission work done on a Ford (or, Mazda) Transmission; be sure, to replace the clutch slave cylinder inside the transmission. Or, you will surely need to know the art of shifting clutchless. :rant:

Big Matt
11-30-2010, 11:05 PM
:Smarty:Any time you have transmission work done on a Ford (or, Mazda) Transmission; be sure, to replace the clutch slave cylinder inside the transmission. Or, you will surely need to know the art of shifting clutchless.

I'd be interested in more info about this statement as my father is about to have the clutch (disc, pressure plate, TO bearing) replaced in his Mazda pick up.

buick64203
11-30-2010, 11:09 PM
Brian, out of curiousity, is it a metal scraping noise?

bhambulldog
11-30-2010, 11:36 PM
I'd be interested in more info about this statement as my father is about to have the clutch (disc, pressure plate, TO bearing) replaced in his Mazda pick up.

Matt,
This is in response to your request for more information.
The Ford/Mazda Transmissions that I have experience driving have the slave cylinder, inside the transmission. Replacing or repairing the slave cylinder involves removing the entire transmission. I recommend replacing the slave cylinder, during clutch replacement. To me, it is false economy to not replace the slave cylinder when the transmission is out for clutch replacement. An inoperative slave cylinder will leave the clutch engaged, and necessitate shifting without the clutch.

kcombs
11-30-2010, 11:52 PM
Back in the day, I have driven home several times without my clutch disengaging. If my memory serves me well, it had to do with a clutch coming apart and the facing being jammed between the pressure plate and what was left of the disk. Not too bad as long as there is little or no traffic. Kind of hard on the starter. Best to be avoided.

r0ckstarr
12-01-2010, 07:20 AM
Solution: Increase the free play of the clutch pedal.

279k miles on the truck. Still has the original clutch in it. Doesn't slip at all. I've been driving it so long that if there is any play, I wouldn't be able to tell unless I compared it to another Ranger. To me, everything still feels the same as it did 200k miles ago.


then find out how good you are at clutchless shifting.

I can do it if need be. You just gotta know where to have the rpm's so that it will drop into the next gear without force. The hardest part is going from a stop to 1st or reverse.


slave cylinder inside the transmission.

Did not want to hear that.:eek2: I was hoping it was something as simple as sliding the transmission back on the crossmember and changing everything there.




Brian, out of curiousity, is it a metal scraping noise?

Nope. It's a whine noise. Sounds similar to when a waterpump bearing starts to go bad, but maybe a little more high pitched and not so loud.