Mechanical temp sensor

Discussion in 'Small Block Tech' started by 72skylarkconvt, May 20, 2019.

  1. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    Yes, use teflon tape.
     
  2. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    Forgot about your other thread. So we have been over the distributor issues if it has that 1112109.
     
  3. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    So initial advance is 4 if spec, it should be 12-14 so it can be around 32 at WOT?

    "It's right on the circumference of the distributor right at the cap parting line. Should be readily visible, easy to see. That 1112109 only has 12-16* of mechanical advance. If you have it timed at 4*BTDC as per the specs, you only have 16-20* of WOT advance when you want 32* for best power. The engine will run much better with more initial advance, 12-14* is usually best."
     
  4. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    Only if you have that 1112109 distributor. A different part number distributor would require something different.
     
  5. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    I will let you know later tonight.
     
  6. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    I have the 1112109 distrib. The TCS location is fine for my mech gauge so it is going in there.
     
  7. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    Good, definitely bump the initial timing to 12* Should perk the engine up and make it run cooler. Run a direct line from the carburetor to the vacuum advance canister. Verify that the canister is working with a timing light.
     
  8. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    well I just drive it with mechanical temp gauge set up. Put it in the TCS spot. I drove it around my town, back roads, 25 miles per hour for about 20 minutes or so. Note that when I started it up from cold it got up to running temp of Tstat in about 3 or 4 minutes, that normal? I took it on the hwy and it climbed up to 210 - 215 and starting creeping from there which I pulled off and shut it off and let it sit. No boiling fluids this time. No leaks anywhere. I let it sit for about 20 minutes and drove it about 1.5 miles home, it stuck about 200 to 205 on the way home.
    I guess I throw a WP and radiator, new clutch fan at it? Fix the timing.
     
  9. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    did run the vac line from distrib to the carb.
     
  10. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    the timing being at 4* can cause it to warm up like it is?
     
  11. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    and FWIW the car has what I still consider pretty good power even when it is hot like this
     
  12. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    So will this distrib I have if initial timing is set to 12* it can hit the WOT of 32* as suggested for best running conditions. Do I need to check for this 32* or if I am set at 12* it will do 32*. Al lof this assuming my vac adv canister is working.
     
  13. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    That distributor can have anywhere from 12-16* of mechanical advance. That means if you set it to 12* initial, it can have anywhere from 24-28* of WOT advance. You can check to see where exactly it is if you know how to use a timing light. You also need to verify that the vacuum advance canister is good. They can go bad from a bad diaphragm. Read the first post and download the word attachment in this thread,

    http://www.v8buick.com/index.php?threads/power-timing-your-buick-v8.63475/
     
  14. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    I will get help with the timing set up. I do not know how to use a light. So if you had my car and it being total stock where would you set the initial timing for best overall performance
     
  15. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    I would set the total timing to 32 and then the initial timing will end up where it needs to be. Print out the word document attached to that 1st post and show it to whoever adjusts your timing.
     
  16. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    I guess I will stay with this thread.
    I may try to work on the timing my self for the first time this weekend. One thing I read is that at some point you have to get the RPM's up to like 3k to find the 36* point, something like that I forgot off head. How do I know that when I have no tach on my car. Do I need to go buy one?
    Which spark plug is #1 and which way is the distrib turned to up the timing to 12* - 14* assuming mine is much lower?
    I know to take off the vac advance before I start the car. I just then start it and point the light it at the numbers on the crank and see where it is flashing at idle then adjust from there?
     
  17. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    #1 plug is the front plug on the driver's side of the engine. The mechanical advance consists of 2 weights that rotate with the distributor. Centrifugal force cause the weights to move out as the distributor spins faster and faster. The 2 weights have springs that oppose the centrifugal force. At some point the weights overcome spring tension and move all the way out and stop. As the distributor slows down, the springs pull the weights back in. As the weights move out, they alter the position of the rotor to advance the timing.. The amount of mechanical advance in each distributor is governed by a pin that moves in a slot. The length of the slot determines how much mechanical advance is built into that distributor. This varies with the part number distributor which is meant for a specific engine size and model year. The spring tension determines at what RPM, the weights move to their outermost position (full advance). Changing the springs alters the RPM when full mechanical advance occurs.

    There is a timing mark on the harmonic balancer. There is a scale on the timing cover. The scale typically runs from 0 to 12*. It pays to wipe off the timing scale and highlight the timing mark with white paint before you do anything. Setting initial timing involves disconnecting and plugging the hose to the vacuum advance, loosening the distributor hold down bolt JUST ENOUGH so that you can BARELY turn the distributor by hand. THEN start the engine. Point the light at the timing cover and see where the line is in relation to the scale. To advance the timing, turn the distributor counter clockwise when looking at it from the top. To retard the timing, clockwise. The distributor turns half the speed of the crank, so 1* of distributor rotation equals 2* at the crank. Move the distributor slowly and in very small increments.

    If you can understand and accomplish this much, I'll tell you how to check and set the total advance.

    I
     
    Abel Andres Duque likes this.
  18. hwprouty

    hwprouty Platinum Level Contributor

    I like your style Tim!
    Most folks would run away from a challenge!
    Good on you!
     
  19. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    video I have watched says car should be at running temp before do this stuff???
     
  20. 72skylarkconvt

    72skylarkconvt Well-Known Member

    It appears the timing light has the capability to show rpms.
     

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