More '67 Flint Factory Markings

Discussion in 'Chassis restoration' started by Electra man, Sep 26, 2018.

  1. Electra man

    Electra man Older and Slower

    20180920_152157.jpg So alls been good this summer with my mostly original 67 Electra until a few days ago. A wheel cylinder went in the rear. I have to say it was not unexpected as I haven't addressed them yet and they were original. As I was breaking it down for the repair these markings were unearthed. There is an 870 on the wheel in grease pencil which I am unsure of being factory but it's possible, if anyone knows chime in. Next is the P1 in yellow paint on the drum with a small dab of yellow on the hub that matches it so that was applied with the drum on the axle. And third is the green paint in the center of the hub on both sides. Interestingly the green matches exactly the green that was found on my original steering linkage when I replaced it. Here are some pictures of what was found. I've included pictures of the green paint from the front end for comparison. I'm sure the green is an inspector's marking and the P1 as well? The 870 who knows? - Bill 20180920_144708.jpg 20180920_145654.jpg 20180902_225522.jpg 20180902_225430.jpg
     
  2. Electra man

    Electra man Older and Slower

    20180927_160550.jpg 20180927_160557.jpg 20180927_160636.jpg 20180927_170408.jpg So after the brake job I decided to give the Electra a bath. These markings were there so I decided to document them. First there is this grease pencil marking on top of the firewall above the wiper motor. Its somewhat worn but it looks like it says NO GIT. Just past that where the firewall steps up there are the remains of a round sticker with the remains of another in the same location on the other side. Just past that is the rectangle neon green one that has lost its writing. Down low below the A/C unit is a round neon green one that the number 3 can still be seen on it with another blanked out one below it. That's all for today please see the pics. Comments on these markings are welcome. - Bill
     
  3. scubasteve455

    scubasteve455 Well-Known Member

    Good Stuff
     
  4. Duane

    Duane Member

    Bill OK,
    I will jump in here a little. My knowledge is almost all A-bodies but I can tell you a little about what we have found on them.
    I have also talked to quite a few of the line workers both at Flint Final Assembly and at the Fisher Plant, and from other plants as well.

    As far as the "870" on the wheels, I have seen this on a few a-bodies from Flint and the number crayoned on the wheel matched the number crayoned on the driver side saddle bag (under the front fender), and also the number found on what I call The Fisher Body "Cheat Sheet" that is usually found under the passenger front seat under the seat springs. From what we have been able to figure out this was the number assigned to the shell as it went down the assembly line. The number made sure the correct parts went on the right car.

    As far as the green paint splotches/slashes. I have assembly manuals for a-body Buicks from 64-72 and many of them call out "documentation required" on them. What this meant (on the line) was after the parts were assembled on the car an inspector was supposed to check to make sure everything was torqued. This "documentation" was basically where he used a small paint brush to mark the parts as finished. If they were not there then an inspector further down the line was supposed to check to verify everything was done. I have seen yellow, green, orange, red, etc. It seemed they used what ever color was available, or possibly different inspectors used different colors. Who knows.

    Your "P1" is probably the designation of the axle assembly, or brake drum. The different Plants identified parts differently. Some used colors, some used color stickers, others numbers, or partial part numbers to ID pieces. The only way to figure out what each plant did is to find build sheets and figure it out from the codes. Your "stickers" on the cowl are probably this type of ID.

    (It takes a lot of time to do this and I only have some of that info for the 70-72 A-bodies from Fremont, Framingham, and Flint.)

    I can't quite tell but that 1 suspension piece you show with the yellow paint mark might be the front spindle. On the a-bodies we had drum and disc spindles so they were color coded accordingly. That way it was easy to ID the correct spindle. Now I don't know if the 67 Big cars had drums and discs but you would know more about that.

    All this info has taken years to gather up, with looking at hundreds of different original cars, cross referencing everything, looking at assembly manuals, looking at build sheets, and talking to many of the line workers. If you want to take this further, then have at it. Good luck with your quest.
    Duane
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018
  5. Electra man

    Electra man Older and Slower

    Thanks Duane. There are both green and orange markings on the front spindle. Yes there was a disc brake option on 67 and up full size cars, mine has drums. My take away based on what you've said is the orange paint indicates a drum spindle. Based on a 1970 Lemans I restored years ago that car had blue markings on its disc brake spindles if that helps anything. The green is on both the spindle and the tie rod adjusting sleeves & clamps as well as the rear hubs so to me those are the inspectors markings.
    I kind of figured the P1 was an assembly code, in my case 2.77 open diff. 20180703_145310.jpg
    Now on to the 870. If I ever pull the driver side front fender I'll look for it. As far as the cheat sheet no such luck. Mine was under the passenger side of the rear seat. Unfortunately there in no 870 on it, however it does jive with the interior color and options. Perhaps that's a distinct difference between B,C and A bodies?
    Any ideas on what the NO GIT might mean and could that be factory or after the fact?
    This car is a time capsule for a car that has lived its life in the northeast. Very rarely do you get this stuff its usually rusted off. Fortunately this car has lived its pampered life in climate controlled comfort preserving these markings. - Bill
     
  6. Duane

    Duane Member

    The number at the top of the sheet "146" in your case should have matched the number on the saddle bag and wheels. Often on the Flint cars I find that it didn't. What that means is the seat in your car was destined for another car, but you got it. This is a very common thing at Flint. I don't think the assembly line workers cared if the exact seats went with the right car. (They did the same thing with the gas tanks) As long as it was the correct interior who but us, some 50 years later would care.

    As to the other items, that's on you. I gave you what I knew.

    Now you can go drive yourself crazy like I do with this stuff if you want.
    Duane

    PS. Maybe the "NO GIT" on your car was a love note to the next guy in line. Who knows.:D:D:D:D:D
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2018

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