Oil pump rebuild

Discussion in 'Wrenchin' Secrets' started by 69SkylarkGS, Dec 27, 2019.

  1. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    I’ve never done one and am about to embark on doing this soon. The timing cover is off the engine and I’ve removed the filter housing. I’ve disassembled the gears, housing etc. I had to soak the housing in some parts cleaner to remove the gunk as I plan on painting it. I’m going to work on the timing cover next to clean it, as I want to paint it as well. I already have a rebuild kit, booster plate, adjustable oil pressure relief regulator and a shin kit. Just looking for any advice/tips about the process. I’m going to buy a plastigauge to set the clearance and plan on packing with petroleum jelly. Which parts do I need to lube during assembly and any recommended lubricant? I reviewed some previous posts and did some research but want to ask before I do this to make sure I get it right.
     
  2. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

  3. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

  4. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    The factory packed the pocket with petroleum jelly to ensure oil pressure at start up on the assembly line. Some guys seem to object to petroleum jelly. It isn't really necessary as long as you operate the pump with a drill until you see oil pressure, then the pump is primed. What to coat the gears with? Whatever oil you plan to use in the engine.
     
  5. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    I was going to pack the pocket with petroleum jelly and spin the pump. I got the tool from TA to spin it when I bought the rebuild kit etc. I saw a YouTube video where a guy coated the spring and the piece it sits in with some type of lube. I didn’t know if that was necessary and needed anywhere else.
     
  6. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

    oil is all you need.
     
  7. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    Ok, thanks, I appreciate the help!
     
  8. Utah455

    Utah455 Well-Known Member

    the tool you bought from TA, Was that to prime the pump and build up oil pressure? What did you buy? Thanks!
     
  9. LARRY70GS

    LARRY70GS a.k.a. "THE WIZARD"

  10. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    That’s the one ta1509
     
  11. Philip66

    Philip66 Well-Known Member

    Do yourself a favor and paint it red or yellow or something bright.
    Mine tends to camouflage in a tool drawer for some reason. I looked and looked for mine and couldn't find it. It was right there in the drawer the whole time but I just couldn't see it! ;)
    Could be a product of age too...
     
    Mark Demko and Tomahawk like this.
  12. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    That is a good idea. I’m constantly losing stuff and I’m 33 lol. Maybe I’ll paint it Buick red since I’m painting engine parts right now anyway. I’ve got the timing cover, filter housing, Edelbrock intake and stage 1 fuel pump all painted up!
     
  13. Utah455

    Utah455 Well-Known Member


    Hey, stupid question here. If I remove the distributor and use a tool to build up pressure, how long is that good for? Do I need to start the engine right away? Or is there some time pressure stays up? What if I started a week later? Just asking cause I don’t know and haven’t had to do this before. Thanks!
     
  14. Mart

    Mart Gold level member

    The pressure stops as soon as you quit spinning the pump, but you'll have a fresh coating of oil everywhere you need it.
     
  15. Tomahawk

    Tomahawk Gold Level Contributor

    The purpose isn't to build pressure, but to prime the pump.
     
    Mark Demko likes this.
  16. philbquick

    philbquick Founders Club Member

    It will stay forever otherwise every time you engine sat for a few weeks you'd have to re-prime it and of course you don't. No one mentioned the water pump. You need to check to be sure previous water pump failures didn't ream out the rear of the pump chamber. Check for electrolysis damage in the pump area and where the water ports (aluminum) meets the block (iron). The dissimilar metal combination can cause significant pitting, if it bad enough around the gasket area or to the rear of the pump, the cover could be junk. I always spray electrical insulating varnish around the ports on the block and timing cover before assembly to prevent this.
     
  17. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    I didn’t even know to look for this thanks for adding. I’ll check when I get home later. I’m learning as I go so any help is much appreciated! There was a lot of what I’d describe as dried up antifreeze in the pump/cover. I got a new water pump already. I’m debating on replacing my cover anyway though just so the seal is on the outside and other benefits.
     
  18. 69GS400s

    69GS400s ...my own amusement ride!

    .. and, before you pull the distrubor out, mark the side of it and a point on the motor with a grease pencil so you know the orientation when going back in - and DO NOT move the gear/shaft
     
  19. philbquick

    philbquick Founders Club Member

    That dried antifreeze may be through the entire block. I don't know if it re-liquefies when it gets wet, you may want to add some water to some of that to see what it does. Pull the thermostat to see if it's up there too. BTW, you can get a polypropylene front main seal that fits the older cover.
     
  20. 69SkylarkGS

    69SkylarkGS Well-Known Member

    I am replacing the intake with a performer and I’ve got a new thermostat too. There is some of the same material, just not as dried up, in the water passages in the front of the block. I’m assuming it’s probably present through out the passages considering how long this engine sat. I’ve got the new style seal from TA already. I’ll see how it reacts to water next time I work in it.
     

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