Anyone using the CPP C5 style spindles?

Discussion in 'Pro-Touring' started by BillA, Mar 16, 2018.

  1. BillA

    BillA Well-Known Member

    Getting ready to pull the trigger on these spindles from CPP. https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/clp-cp30013/overview/ They are taller than stock but keep the stock ride height. They use readily available C5 Corvette hubs and brake kits. The nice thing about these is they track the same as stock drums. When I switched to disc brakes I lost about 7/16" of space on each side, making wheel fitment pretty tight.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
  2. redsixty9

    redsixty9 Platinum Level Contributor

    That's one thing I learned about changing brakes is you often have to make other changes to accommodate the change. Like wheels choices. The bigger the brake the bigger wheel you'll need. The bigger caliper also needs more room.This also gives you less wheel choices. Custom wheels aren't cheap and many times is where you'll end up. Having the same track as stock drums doesn't mean a stock wheel will fit the brake. There are other alternatives to make your car stop great. Big brakes are impressive but not always the best brake for the application. For instance a lot of racing brakes need a lot of heat to make them work right. Pad,rotor materials and brake fluid are things to consider in a street car. Just changing that could make your car stop better than some conversions and free up some money for other upgrades. What I guess I'm getting to is these are all things to consider. Saving some $$ on one thing can cost you more money having to make it work right than you'll save. Having matched components and a good tech line could save you a ton of money and aggravation when things aren't working out as planned. From experience I have had more aggravation with conversions opposed to buying a package from a company that already has done the R&D on a part that is specifically made for your vehicle. Especially with suspension and brakes. I've worked on plenty of cars that upgraded brakes and suspension parts that handled like crap and stopped worse with the old parts did. Saving money cost me thousands of dollars the last 40yrs of having hot rods. On the plus side I do have a good parts stash of miss matched components to pilfer through. One thing nice about getting older most of my mistake parts or trial and error are considered " Vintage and patina'd" so I got that going for me which is nice. Lol

    I still learn everyday like on my GS400. If I was smarter I would have narrowed the rearend when I had it built. I wouldn't have cost me a dime. I could have saved a bunch of money on wheels instead of having custom ones made. Then again I planed on having wheels made in the first place due to help from a friend who owns a billet wheel company. They are killer and machining is top notch. In my opinion are worth the money for all the time that goes into building them. I don't have the balls to chew him down on prices or put another companies wheels on the car. So my plan is to feed him and his sales crew at Back to the 50's. I'll get him and his crew's belly full all weekend and then make my pitch. ;)
     
  3. BillA

    BillA Well-Known Member

    I like the idea of the modern sealed bearing hub and a separate, removable rotor. I will be limited to brake calipers that fit the C5 spindles but there are a few available that will work with 17" wheels. I can go with a 13" rotor and 4 piston caliper set up from Willwood or a factory style Corvette rotor and 2 piston caliper (even though a base C5 came with 18" wheels their rotors and calipers will fit within most 17" wheels). I can also re-use my existing steering arms. Gaining a 1/2" of tire clearance is a big deal. With a 17x8 wheel that has 4.5" of backspacing my 225's are about a fingers width away from rubbing the fenders. With my current wheels there is no way I can go to a wider tire in the future without that extra 1/2" of clearance the new spindles will provide.
     
  4. redsixty9

    redsixty9 Platinum Level Contributor

    Talk to wilwood or baer tech line see what they recommend for your application. I wanted bigger is better brakes but ended up with a smaller brake rotor and 4 piston caliper. The brakes will throw you through the windshield and run a 15" if needed for the strip.
     
  5. BrianTrick

    BrianTrick Brian Trick

    I was just looking at those a few days ago,but they will not work with the suspension parts that I am installing. Nice kit though. I also don’t want to commit to 17” or larger wheels yet. I don’t know which way I want to go with my current project. I am just going to stick with what I have used before. The B-body spindles with 12” rotors. They stop for sure.
     
  6. Bens99gtp

    Bens99gtp Well-Known Member

    I will have to do some digging, but a saw a kit that uses the 98-02 fbody brakes on abody's too. I swapped my gtp and my ultra over to these....it only requite bushing for the bracket bolts due to the smaller bolts used in the brackets. It was just an aluminum 2 piston calI per over the cast 1 piston, but what a huge differance........I could honestly put the bumper on the road. The are 12 inch rotor's and fit over 16 wheels.......but you wobt gain track width. If I recall it required having the od of the orginal drum hub turned down.
     
  7. ilikebmx999

    ilikebmx999 Well-Known Member

    Kore3 sells kits and parts to put 4th gen f body brakes on.


    I bought some brackets off eBay for $35 and turned down some hubs myself to fit the rotor over the hub. They’re not 100% bolt on but pretty much. I also installed a rear setup from a 4th gen and other than a small shim, was bolt on.
     
  8. Buick 72

    Buick 72 Well-Known Member

    If anyone is looking at using the 98-02 f-body front brake setup that Ben mentions, the wheel spoke to caliper clearance will limit the number of wheels that will fit and he is correct that only 16-inch or larger diameter wheels will fit. If your plan is to buy larger diameter wheels anyway this may not make a difference but if you want to run small diameter or stock-ish wheels then the 98-02 f-body brakes may not work for you so be sure to include that cost too.
     
    ilikebmx999 likes this.
  9. ilikebmx999

    ilikebmx999 Well-Known Member

    That goes for the rear as well. Stock 15” wheels won’t fit unless you use a huge spacer (like 3”).

    I run 18” wheels and being that this is the pro touring section I’d assume most wont be running 15” or even 16” wheels
     
  10. redsixty9

    redsixty9 Platinum Level Contributor

    I'm running Baer SS4+ brakes all around. I do need a spacer on front and back. I think it's a 1/8" on front and a 1/4" on the back. I like having the choice of running 15" wheels for drag racing. It definitely hooks a lot better with a bigger side wall on the back. I originally wanted huge brakes but the brakes I have stop on a dime and look great. I was told by Baer it would be the best choice and the only advantage of having big brakes are if it's a committed track car or doing a lot of track days. I've auto crossed it and never had any brake failure. 20180304_152142.jpg
     
    mild2wild likes this.
  11. ilikebmx999

    ilikebmx999 Well-Known Member

    The price of the f body brakes and the fact I’m not really into drag racing (time slips at 6k feet are soul crushing) it was worth it for me. Worst case scenario I could run a 16” wheel out back with drag radials or I know some 15” wheels will clear (f body guys do it).
     
  12. BillA

    BillA Well-Known Member

    This is the kit I'm leaning towards. I'll need 1-1/2" of clearance between the mounting surface and the inner side of the spokes. I'll pull a wheel and measure before I order them but I should be good, although it will be very close. I can use a high quality 1/8" spacer if I need to. As a last resort CPP sells a twin piston floating caliper that will work with my wheels.

    https://www.summitracing.com/int/parts/wil-140-15175-dr/overview/
     

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